As language evolves, new words are born and others die out. In this article we look at some delightful, slightly naughty English words that time has forgotten – maybe you could start your own mini language revival and begin using them in your everyday conversation !

Bouffage

… a satisfying meal; adopted from Old French bouffage

Bum-Curtain

… 1930s slang for a flashily dressed woman.

Callipygian

… of, pertaining to, or having well-shaped or finely developed buttocks

Chatillionte

… delightful, amusing. From French chatouiller, to tickle, to provoke with delight.

Condiddle

… to convey away secretly

Crapulence

… intestinal & cranial distress arising from intemperance & debauchery

Flapdoodle

… nonsense, rubbish, balderdash. The name of an imaginary food fools supposedly liked to eat.

Giglet

… a merry light-hearted, playful, romping girl

Gundiguts

… a 17th century term for an extremely overweight person

Hochle

… to tumble lewdly with women in open day

Mumpsimus

… a Middle English word meaning “an incorrigible, dogmatic old pedant,”

Pilgarlik

…a 16th century word for a bald head, which apparently resembled peeled garlic.

Scurryfunge

… a hasty tidying of the house between the time you see a neighbour and the time she knocks on the door

Tatterwallop

… old Scots word for an untidily dressed person.

Toozle

… to pull about – especially applied to any rough dalliance with a female

Vinipote

… a wine drinker

Wagpastie

… a term of contempt; a rogue

Woofits

… the unpleasant after effects of overindulgence, especially drinking